88
17 Apr 14 at 10 pm

A few pictures from the Harvard Center for Astrophysics lecture tonight.

My coworker has a real NASA astronaut outfit and let me put it on and take a picture with it!

Also, an ex president of Mexico came to the lecture tonight! Isn’t that awesome?! I wanted a picture with him but I didn’t get the chance.

Great night regardless!!

• New giveaway once I hit 10,000 followers (I’m at 9,200 right now) and I really have the two products now, a signed book and a laser pointer. Pictures and more info coming soon. Sorry for not carrying through for the 5,000 follower mark!! I promise I will follow through this time.

• I really want to apologize for not getting back to everyone’s questions. I really want to answer a bunch of them so I can clear out my inbox and stop making people wait if they have questions. Also thank you if it’s a compliment about my blog!!!! I always really, really appreciate those messages even if I don’t reply. I don’t mean to ignore them, I’m just swamped. I’ll probably do a mass answering of a bunch of messages at some point this weekend.

- An Astronomy Nerd

 118
17 Apr 14 at 11 am

jstn:

Mount Wilson, 1929.

(via oneoftheunknown)

jstn:

Mount Wilson, 1929.
Eclipse Luna 2014-04-14 by gvanhau on Flickr.
Cielo del Paine by Adhemar Duro on Flickr.
 109627
15 Apr 14 at 8 am

orbitalencounters:

Total lunar eclipse for the Americas on April 14th 15th 2014

(via abcstarstuff)

orbitalencounters:

Total lunar eclipse for the Americas on April 14th 15th 2014

sci-universe:

To everyone who didn’t see the Mars opposition yesterday: no problem, the planet is notable the whole month!

(via sagansense)

 62
13 Apr 14 at 9 am

Personal Post

So I thought I’d share some of my prom pictures with you guys! As you can see, I chose the black dress. I had such a good time. Yes that guy I’m kissing is my boyfriend :)

tags: personal  me  prom 
meadows of stars by bob stough on Flickr.
 53
07 Apr 14 at 11 am

procyonsuniverse:

How long a star can stay shining depends on how massive it is - but it probably works the opposite way to how you’d expect! Even though less massive stars have a lot less hydrogen fuel to burn*, they still last much longer than more massive stars. How does that work?

It’s…

Fact of the day
 264
06 Apr 14 at 12 pm

The Rosette Nebula by Tim Stone on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
This image is not in true color. Hydrogen is mapped to green, Oxygen to blue, and Sulfur to red. The predominantly cyan color of the image is due the co-location of Hydrogen and Oxygen, which of course are the two components of water. While water is probably not yet abundant in this nebula, it’s clear where it all comes from.

The entire image is about 110 light years in width, a staggering size when you think about it. Light that left a star on the left edge of the image on the day I was born has only made it halfway across the image at this point.

This nebula is somewhere around 5000 light years distant. The light my camera recorded left that object some 500 years before Egypt’s pyramids were built. Virtually all of recorded human history occurred in the time it took that light to arrive at my camera in the winter of 2013. Virtually all of the technology used to capture, process, display, and distribute the image on flickr was invented in the last .6% of its journey.

While it may appear that there are a large number of stars in this nebula, remember that we’re looking through 5000 light years of space to see it. Most of the stars recorded in the image are somewhere between here and there. That said, there are indeed a large number of stars in this nebula, but most of them are visible only in infrared light because they’re still embedded in their cocoons of gas and dust deep inside. Eventually the radiant energy from these newborn stars will dispel the entire nebula, leaving only a sparkling cluster of stars with their solar systems and all the ingredients of life itself.

I’ve reduced the size of this image by 50% from its full resolution of 3720x3444. At that resolution, each pixel spans about .03 light years, so in this version’s full resolution, each pixel spans .06 light years. While that might seem small, Pluto’s orbital diameter is about .0013 light years, so 46 of our solar systems would fit within each pixel.

You can find more technical information on this image’s Astrobin page.

The Rosette Nebula by Tim Stone on Flickr.Via Flickr:
This image is not in true color. Hydrogen is mapped to green, Oxygen to blue, and Sulfur to red. The predominantly cyan color of the image is due the co-location of Hydrogen and Oxygen, which of course are the two components of water. While water is probably not yet abundant in this nebula, it’s clear where it all comes from.
The entire image is about 110 light years in width, a staggering size when you think about it. Light that left a star on the left edge of the image on the day I was born has only made it halfway across the image at this point.
This nebula is somewhere around 5000 light years distant. The light my camera recorded left that object some 500 years before Egypt’s pyramids were built. Virtually all of recorded human history occurred in the time it took that light to arrive at my camera in the winter of 2013. Virtually all of the technology used to capture, process, display, and distribute the image on flickr was invented in the last .6% of its journey.
While it may appear that there are a large number of stars in this nebula, remember that we’re looking through 5000 light years of space to see it. Most of the stars recorded in the image are somewhere between here and there. That said, there are indeed a large number of stars in this nebula, but most of them are visible only in infrared light because they’re still embedded in their cocoons of gas and dust deep inside. Eventually the radiant energy from these newborn stars will dispel the entire nebula, leaving only a sparkling cluster of stars with their solar systems and all the ingredients of life itself.
I’ve reduced the size of this image by 50% from its full resolution of 3720x3444. At that resolution, each pixel spans about .03 light years, so in this version’s full resolution, each pixel spans .06 light years. While that might seem small, Pluto’s orbital diameter is about .0013 light years, so 46 of our solar systems would fit within each pixel. 
You can find more technical information on this image’s Astrobin page.
 412
06 Apr 14 at 12 am

mapsontheweb:

Map of spaceports with achieved satellite launches.

Source: afrofagne (reddit)

(via abcstarstuff)

mapsontheweb:

Map of spaceports with achieved satellite launches.
Source: afrofagne (reddit)
 651
05 Apr 14 at 3 pm

astronomicalwonders:

Lenticular Galaxy NGC 524

Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

(via sagansense)

astronomicalwonders:

Lenticular Galaxy NGC 524
Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
 553
04 Apr 14 at 1 pm

theworkofchad:

Taken last year, a heavy glow from a distant boat which could easily be mistaken for the sun, acts as a spotlight for our galaxy to help emphasise the many colours in milky way core.

Click here for more of my work

Prints available here

theworkofchad:

Taken last year, a heavy glow from a distant boat which could easily be mistaken for the sun, acts as a spotlight for our galaxy to help emphasise the many colours in milky way core.
Click here for more of my work
Prints available here
 478
03 Apr 14 at 10 pm

thedemon-hauntedworld:

M8: The Lagoon Nebula
Image Credit & Copyright: Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

This beautiful cosmic cloud is a popular stop on telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius. Eighteenth century cosmic tourist Charles Messier cataloged the bright nebula as M8. Modern day astronomers recognize the Lagoon Nebula as an active stellar nursery about 5,000 light-years distant, in the direction of the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Hot stars in the embedded open star cluster NGC 6530 power the nebular glow. Remarkable features can be traced through this sharp picture, showing off the Lagoon’s filaments of glowing gas and dark dust clouds. Twisting near the center of the Lagoon, the small, bright hourglass shape is the turbulent result of extreme stellar winds and intense starlight. The alluring color view was captured with a telescope and digital camera while M8 was high in dark, rural Argentina skies. At the nebula’s estimated distance, the picture spans over 60 light-years.

thedemon-hauntedworld:

M8: The Lagoon Nebula 
Image Credit & Copyright: Ignacio Diaz Bobillo

This beautiful cosmic cloud is a popular stop on telescopic tours of the constellation Sagittarius. Eighteenth century cosmic tourist Charles Messier cataloged the bright nebula as M8. Modern day astronomers recognize the Lagoon Nebula as an active stellar nursery about 5,000 light-years distant, in the direction of the center of our Milky Way Galaxy. Hot stars in the embedded open star cluster NGC 6530 power the nebular glow. Remarkable features can be traced through this sharp picture, showing off the Lagoon’s filaments of glowing gas and dark dust clouds. Twisting near the center of the Lagoon, the small, bright hourglass shape is the turbulent result of extreme stellar winds and intense starlight. The alluring color view was captured with a telescope and digital camera while M8 was high in dark, rural Argentina skies. At the nebula’s estimated distance, the picture spans over 60 light-years.