13
18 Sep 14 at 5 pm

Click on the “Watch it Live” link next to the title of the first description.

What is a Planet? - First Public CfA Lecture of the Season!
afro-dominicano:


How Old Are They?
 132
19 Aug 14 at 4 pm

adlerplanetarium:

#Explore Our Solar System! Touch a piece of the Moon, Mars, Ceres, and Vesta, and observe the similarities and differences between planets, moons, and asteroids. Don’t forget to #lookup! #science4everyone (at The Adler Planetarium)

(via sagansense)

adlerplanetarium:

#Explore Our Solar System!  Touch a piece of the Moon, Mars, Ceres, and Vesta, and observe the similarities and differences between planets, moons, and asteroids. Don’t forget to #lookup! #science4everyone (at The Adler Planetarium)
 2006
26 Jul 14 at 12 am

space-wallpapers:

Eye to the Galaxy

(via ryannathans)

space-wallpapers:

Eye to the Galaxy
 256
22 Jul 14 at 11 pm

astronomynerd:

15,000 follower giveaway!

I finally have everything, so I will be following through this time.

Remember, this is not for the 15,000th follower, but for my top fans (the ones who reblog/like the most) at the time that I hit 15,000 followers.

My #1 fan will receive:

  • A promotional post
  • A Skyline Deluxe green laser pointer (batteries included) 3.5-4.5 mW
  • A signed edition  of “Space Encyclopedia” by the author and my friend David Aguilar

The next three top fans will also receive promotional posts.

I will use the top fans of the “Last Month” tracking data, so use your time wisely!

Reblog to spread the word!

I’m still doing this when I get to 15k! I’m only 100 followers away so get a move on it.

Remember: it is NOT my 15,000th follower. It is my TOP followers once I get there. To get to top followers, you will have to reblog/like my posts.

 2527
18 Jul 14 at 7 pm

spaceplasma:

One Special Day in the Life of Planet Earth

The cameras on NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured this rare look at Earth and its moon from Saturn orbit on July 19, 2013. Taken while performing a large wide-angle mosaic of the entire Saturn ring system, narrow-angle camera images were deliberately inserted into the sequence in order to image Earth and its moon. This is the second time that Cassini has imaged Earth from within Saturn’s shadow, and only the third time ever that our planet has been imaged from the outer solar system.

Earth is the blue point of light on the left; the moon is fainter, white, and on the right. Both are seen here through the faint, diffuse E ring of Saturn. Earth was brighter than the estimated brightness used to calculate the narrow-angle camera exposure times. Hence, information derived from the wide-angle camera images was used to process this color composite.

Both Earth and the moon have been increased in brightness for easy visibility; in addition, brightness of the Moon has been increased relative to the Earth, and the brightness of the E ring has been increased as well.

The first image of Earth captured from the outer solar system was taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 in 1990 and famously titled “Pale Blue Dot”. Sixteen years later, in 2006, Cassini imaged the Earth in the stunning and unique mosaic of Saturn called “In Saturn’s Shadow-The Pale Blue Dot”. And, seven years further along, Cassini did it again in a coordinated event that became the first time that Earth’s inhabitants knew in advance that they were being imaged from nearly a billion miles (nearly 1.5 billion kilometers) away. It was the also the first time that Cassini’s highest-resolution camera was employed so that Earth and its moon could be captured as two distinct targets.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI

(via sagansense)

 925
18 Jul 14 at 7 pm

christinetheastrophysicist:

A few days ago, we found out that comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is a contact binary. Now we have rotating view of it. This gif uses 36 images each separated by 20 minutes to show a 360° view of the comet. It takes the comet 12.4 hours to complete one rotation.

Read more about the comet on the Rosetta Blog.

(via thenewenlightenmentage)

christinetheastrophysicist:

A few days ago, we found out that comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is a contact binary. Now we have rotating view of it. This gif uses 36 images each separated by 20 minutes to show a 360° view of the comet. It takes the comet 12.4 hours to complete one rotation.
Read more about the comet on the Rosetta Blog.
 319
12 Jul 14 at 4 pm

thenewenlightenmentage:

Out of an hours-long explosion, a stand-in for the first stars

Astronomers analyzing a long-lasting blast of high-energy light observed in 2013 report finding features strikingly similar to those expected from an explosion from the universe’s earliest stars. If this interpretation is correct, the outburst validates ideas about a recently identified class of gamma-ray burst and serves as a stand-in for what future observatories may see as the last acts of the first stars.

"One of the great challenges of modern astrophysics has been the quest to identify the first generation of stars to form in the universe, which we refer to as Population III stars," explained lead scientist Luigi Piro, the director of research at the Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology in Rome, a division of Italy’s National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). "This important event takes us one step closer."

Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

Out of an hours-long explosion, a stand-in for the first stars
Astronomers analyzing a long-lasting blast of high-energy light observed in 2013 report finding features strikingly similar to those expected from an explosion from the universe’s earliest stars. If this interpretation is correct, the outburst validates ideas about a recently identified class of gamma-ray burst and serves as a stand-in for what future observatories may see as the last acts of the first stars.
"One of the great challenges of modern astrophysics has been the quest to identify the first generation of stars to form in the universe, which we refer to as Population III stars," explained lead scientist Luigi Piro, the director of research at the Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology in Rome, a division of Italy’s National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). "This important event takes us one step closer."
Continue Reading
 765
12 Jul 14 at 4 pm

distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

distant-traveller:

SN 1006 supernova remnant

A new star, likely the brightest supernova in recorded human history, lit up planet Earth’s sky in the year 1006 AD. The expanding debris cloud from the stellar explosion, found in the southerly constellation of Lupus, still puts on a cosmic light show across the electromagnetic spectrum. In fact, this composite view includes X-ray data in blue from the Chandra Observatory, optical data in yellowish hues, and radio image data in red. Now known as the SN 1006 supernova remnant, the debris cloud appears to be about 60 light-years across and is understood to represent the remains of a white dwarf star. Part of a binary star system, the compact white dwarf gradually captured material from its companion star. The buildup in mass finally triggered a thermonuclear explosion that destroyed the dwarf star. Because the distance to the supernova remnant is about 7,000 light-years, that explosion actually happened 7,000 years before the light reached Earth in 1006. Shockwaves in the remnant accelerate particles to extreme energies and are thought to be a source of the mysterious cosmic rays.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Zolt Levay (STScI)
 4277
06 Jul 14 at 5 pm

s-c-i-guy:

Heavens Peak Overlook, Glacier National Park, Montana
s-c-i-guy:

Heavens Peak Overlook, Glacier National Park, Montana
 82986
06 Jul 14 at 5 pm

breakingnews:

NASA astronaut films lightning from ISS

Astronaut Reid Wiseman posted a Vine from the International Space Station today showing lightning over Houston.

Tornado warnings were issued in the Houston area earlier this afternoon but have since expired.

(via stammertime)

 3817
02 Jul 14 at 11 am

the-actual-universe:

The Sun is better than art

This incredible image was produced using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) taken on January 17, 2003. This is the sun photographed as it was building towards a major eruption.

SDO carries imaging instruments that photograph different wavelengths of light released from the sun. If you remember your physics, there is a relationship between the wavelength of light, the frequency of the light, and the energy of the light, so SDO images basically reflect the temperature of the sun.

The colors in this shot are 3 different wavelengths of light. Temperature across the sun’s surface and in its corona varies as gases are moved around by convection and by the sun’s powerful magnetic field. Images like this are both gorgeous and help scientists understand the forces churning beneath the surface of the body at the heart of the solar system.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA Goddard/SDO

(Source: facebook.com, via s-c-i-guy)

the-actual-universe:

The Sun is better than artThis incredible image was produced using data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) taken on January 17, 2003. This is the sun photographed as it was building towards a major eruption.SDO carries imaging instruments that photograph different wavelengths of light released from the sun. If you remember your physics, there is a relationship between the wavelength of light, the frequency of the light, and the energy of the light, so SDO images basically reflect the temperature of the sun.The colors in this shot are 3 different wavelengths of light. Temperature across the sun’s surface and in its corona varies as gases are moved around by convection and by the sun’s powerful magnetic field. Images like this are both gorgeous and help scientists understand the forces churning beneath the surface of the body at the heart of the solar system.-JBBImage credit: NASA Goddard/SDO

oneoftheunknown:

being high from staring at the stars.

image

Beautiful

 200
28 Jun 14 at 3 pm

sagansense:

Who wants to go to SPACE?

The Urgency Network - in conjunction with VICE Media’s MOTHERBOARD - are providing you the opportunity to win a trip to the “edge of space” aboard the Lynx Mark II spacecraft, courtesy of XCOR Aerospace.

Package includes:

- A “Founders Ticket" to space on XCOR’s Lynx spacecraft, making you one of the first 100 people to experience this life changing journey with SXC.

- Exclusive status as SXC’s “Founding Astronaut

- 4g simulator training mission

- Roll Out // Assignment party

- Video of the entire experience

- Bragging rights for life!

Journeying to the von Karmen Line, this 100km (338,000ft) altitude is generally recognized by the international community as the “threshold of space, qualifying you for ASTRONAUT STATUS upon your return to ground.

STEP 1: Choose a nonprofit you’d like to champion.

STEP 2: Enter your donation amount. Choose from rewards based on the amount you give.

STEP 3: Complete actions like inviting your friends, watching awareness videos, and sharing on social media to get additional entries and other prizes.

Every $1,000,000 raised unlocks another ticket. And no matter what, someone is going to space!

SO, who wants in?

Click HERE, then enter the promo code: iwanttobeanastronaut, and you could be on your way.

S/O to my hometown bro, Brandon Deroche - Co-Founder of The Urgency Network and The Make Yourself Foundation (with Brandon Boyd of Incubus) - who generously provided the promo link and password (in conjunction with and support of our film, I want to be an Astronaut).

Founders Donald Eley and Brandon Deroche. Read what Forbes had to say about the Ticket To Rise campaign…

He’s doing wonderful things for humanity right now, and you all should follow The Urgency Network. It’s the incentivized-humanity-helping-inspiration-enriching-crowdsourcing/funding-non-profit-aiding social experience we can all participate in and be proud of.

Again, click HERE, then enter the promo code: iwanttobeanastronaut, and you could find yourself suiting up, for real.

#astronautsBRO

 200
28 Jun 14 at 3 pm

distant-traveller:

Orion arising

Orion’s belt runs just along the horizon, seen through Earth’s atmosphere and rising in this starry snapshot from low Earth orbit on board the International Space Station. The belt stars, Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka run right to left and Orion’s sword, home to the great Orion Nebula, hangs above his belt, an orientation unfamiliar to denizens of the planet’s northern hemisphere. That puts bright star Rigel, at the foot of Orion, still higher above Orion’s belt. Of course the brightest celestial beacon in the frame is Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. The station’s Destiny Laboratory module is in the foreground at the top right.

Image credit: NASA, ISS Expedition 40, Reid Wiseman

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

distant-traveller:

Orion arising

Orion’s belt runs just along the horizon, seen through Earth’s atmosphere and rising in this starry snapshot from low Earth orbit on board the International Space Station. The belt stars, Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka run right to left and Orion’s sword, home to the great Orion Nebula, hangs above his belt, an orientation unfamiliar to denizens of the planet’s northern hemisphere. That puts bright star Rigel, at the foot of Orion, still higher above Orion’s belt. Of course the brightest celestial beacon in the frame is Sirius, alpha star of the constellation Canis Major. The station’s Destiny Laboratory module is in the foreground at the top right.

Image credit: NASA, ISS Expedition 40, Reid Wiseman